Income

This is the income a family needs to cover normal living expenses in New Hampshire | New Hampshire

We all need a certain amount of money each month to pay for normal living expenses, and in recent months this amount has become much higher. Whether at the pump or the grocery store, Americans are being hit with a serious case of sticker shock.

The consumer price index rose 8.5% annually in March, the largest increase since December 1981. Gasoline prices accounted for more than half of the cost increase, but the cost of groceries also increased by 10% over the previous year.

According to the family budget calculator published by the nonprofit Economic Policy think tank, an average family of four can expect their living expenses in 2022 to be $86,718. This model assumes a family of two adults and two children – aged four and eight – and a modest but adequate standard of living. Cost estimates include expenses for housing, food, childcare, transportation, health care, taxes, and other necessities.

In New Hampshire, the estimated cost of living for a family of four is $83,859 for 2022, lower than the national average and 22nd highest among states. Of all living expense categories, child care has the highest annual cost in New Hampshire, averaging $15,612 per year for a family of four, or 18.6% of annual expenses esteemed by the family.

The average cost of living for a family of four in the state highlights the financial challenges that many New Hampshire families face. According to five-year estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, there are about 351,400 families living in the state, and about 13.8 percent of them earn less than $40,000 a year.

Rank State Avg. living expenses for a family of 4 in 2022 ($) Most expensive cost of living category East. cost of the most expensive category, 2022 ($) Families earning less than $40,000 per year (%)
1 New York 112,751 child care 31,874 21.8
2 Hawaii 111,092 Lodging 23,335 15.4
3 Massachusetts 109 184 child care 26,377 16.1
4 California 101 407 Lodging 23,734 20.4
5 New Jersey 97,717 child care 20,144 16.6
6 Connecticut 95,550 child care 18,113 16.4
7 Alaska 94,945 child care 22,447 16.3
8 Vermont 94,517 Health care 19,240 19.1
9 Oregon 92,861 child care 19,026 20.7
ten Washington 92,387 child care 18,876 16.4
11 Colorado 92 197 child care 19,418 16.3
12 Wyoming 91,802 Health care 21,337 18.8
13 Virginia 91,515 child care 17,347 17.5
14 Maryland 89,052 Lodging 17,840 14.6
15 Delaware 87,980 Health care 17,175 19.1
16 Minnesota 87,246 child care 20,635 15.6
17 Illinois 86 153 child care 18,131 20.1
18 West Virginia 85,913 Health care 24,483 30.6
19 Arizona 84,889 child care 17,391 23.8
20 Nebraska 84,527 child care 18,934 18.9
21 Rhode Island 84,019 child care 18,589 19.4
22 New Hampshire 83,859 child care 15,612 13.8
23 Pennsylvania 83 813 child care 19,039 20.7
24 Maine 83,440 Health care 15 101 21.5
25 Florida 82,998 Lodging 15,232 25.6
26 Nevada 81,680 child care 17,051 23.2
27 Montana 81,516 child care 17,025 22.6
28 Utah 80,653 child care 16 111 16.2
29 North Dakota 80,475 child care 20,541 17.5
30 Wisconsin 79,856 child care 17,092 19.3
31 Indiana 79,612 child care 18 107 22.8
32 Kansas 79 124 Health care 16,767 20.5
33 Alabama 79,057 Health care 17,245 28.4
34 South Dakota 78,824 Health care 19,489 20.5
35 North Carolina 78,686 Health care 15,361 25.8
36 Oklahoma 78,408 Health care 16,062 27.2
37 Idaho 78,273 Transportation 15,147 22.7
38 Georgia 78 192 Health care 15,341 25.1
39 Michigan 78,057 child care 17,276 22.9
40 Louisiana 76,581 Health care 17,522 31.1
41 Texas 76,087 Transportation 13,907 24.4
42 Missouri 75,570 Health care 16 101 23.6
43 Kentucky 74,849 Health care 14,951 28.8
44 Tennessee 74 197 Health care 14,990 26.6
45 Iowa 73,867 Transportation 14,656 19.5
46 Ohio 73,570 child care 14,489 23.3
47 New Mexico 72,948 child care 14,800 31.2
48 Caroline from the south 72,542 Health care 14,677 26.7
49 Arkansas 70,474 Health care 14,413 30.5
50 Mississippi 70 116 Health care 17,460 33.3